UBED—JMU’s Virginia Center for Wind Energy Educates the Industry

Friday, 29 June 2012 11:12 by Info@YesVirginia.org

Continuing our series on University-Based Economic Development, we will look at how James Madison University’s (JMU) Virginia Center for Wind Energy (VCWE) keeps industry professionals educated on wind power developments in Virginia.

Located in a 4,000-square-foot commercial lab space near JMU’s main campus, the center has been active since 2001. VCWE provides measurements, economic modeling, education, energy policy analysis and GIS reports on wind energy in the Commonwealth.

VCWE recently hosted the 2012 Statewide Wind Energy Symposium, which included panel discussions and workshops ranging from Wind 101 to Regulatory and Permitting Options. The 150 attendees included government officials, wind industry decision-makers, business owners and Virginia residents.

During the symposium VCWE launched its Small Wind Training & Testing Facility, which will be used primarily for workforce training in the small wind industry. Small wind is traditionally defined as turbines below 100 kilowatts (kW) with most residential turbines under 20 kW. Through the center students will have access to three wind turbines, a WeatherBug weather station, a solar array system and additional measurement equipment.

Uncertainty still surrounds the national production tax credit, and locally, many cities do not have wind ordinances in place, making education the critical mandate for VCWE.

“The Small Wind Training and Testing Facility was designed to address a lack of available resources in the region to support the training of a small wind workforce throughout Virginia and beyond. This resource will support teaching of undergraduates at JMU and other educational institutions throughout the Commonwealth, as well as the training of residents and business owners who seek to learn more about how to apply wind energy in Virginia,” said Dr. Jonathan Miles, VCWE Director.

Fortunately Virginia has a compelling wind story with its shallow waters, strong Class 6 winds, high voltage transmission grid, and maritime workforce. To learn more JMU’s Virginia Center for Wind Energy, click here.

Dr. Jonathan Miles, VCWE Director, addresses the crowd at the JMU Small Wind Training & Testing Facility ribbon-cutting ceremony.

Virginia’s Wind Industry Moves Forward On and Offshore

Friday, 17 February 2012 10:01 by Info@YesVirginia.org

The federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) recently initiated a Call for Information and Nominations to determine industry interest in commercial wind energy leases in federal waters off Virginia’s coast. This announcement is a significant milestone advancing Virginia’s offshore wind industry and moving the Commonwealth closer to claiming the title, “Energy Capital of the East Coast.”

Industry participants will have 45 days to respond to the Call, after which BOEM will determine whether the leasing process will be competitive or not. The Call Area was determined by the Virginia Renewable Energy Task Force in an effort to balance offshore wind development with protection of the environment and shipping interests. BOEM recently completed an environmental assessment of the area and determined that there would be “no significant impacts” in issuing these leases.

Virginia has already made significant strides in developing its offshore wind energy assets. The Commonwealth’s ideal combination of strong Class 6 winds and shallow waters that allow for the easy installation of turbines has attracted a number of players in the global supply chain.

Last October, Virginia’s Northampton County was selected as the site for Poseidon Atlantic, the first comprehensive testing and certification facility for both offshore and land-based wind turbines in the U.S. Poseidon Atlantic recently installed its first Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) monitoring position in Northampton County. The LIDAR system is about the size of an air conditioner and uses laser technology to measure wind speed, direction, frequency and strength. This project will be uniquely able to test and certify the entire wind turbine (as opposed to testing component parts).

In addition, Gamesa Technology Corp. and Newport News Shipbuilding, a unit of Huntington Ingalls Industries, have launched the Gamesa Offshore Wind Technology Center in Chesapeake, Va. The center has made significant strides in developing an offshore testing facility in the Chesapeake Bay, off the Eastern Shore. The test site has been identified and submarine testing of the ocean floor has begun. The test site is expected to be complete in late 2012 to early 2013.

To learn more about Virginia’s energy assets and why more than 380 energy companies have established operations in the Commonwealth, click here.

 

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The Virginia Economic Development Partnership (VEDP), a state authority created by the Virginia General Assembly to better serve those seeking a prime business location and increased trade opportunities, provides confidential site selection and international trade services. VEDP's mission: To enhance the quality of life and raise the standard of living for all Virginians, in collaboration with Virginia communities, through aggressive business recruitment, expansion assistance, and trade development, thereby expanding the tax base and creating higher-income employment opportunities.

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